Archives for the month of: March, 2017

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Romalea microptera (Romalea guttata)

Size: adult female 50-70mm (2-2.8″), males 43-55mm (1.7-2.2″)

Location: Southeastern US, broad range in low, wet areas in pastures and woods and along ditches.  In north Florida from about March to November.

Food:  broad variety, but prefers broad-leafed plants.  Polyphagous — eats small amounts of a large variety of plants.  In Florida can create problems in citrus groves, vegetable plots and landscape ornamentals.

Life cycle:  One generation per year, with eggs over wintering (this stage can be as long as 8 months), egg laying begins about one month after reaching adult hood, usually the summer months.  Eggs are deposited in soil located in drier areas although adults prefer damp or wet habitats.

Predators:  tachinid fly (Anisia serotina).   Most birds and lizards avoid these insects, except loggerheard shrikes (Lanius ludovicianus) will capture them, impale and cache the grasshoppers on barbed wire and return when the toxins have degraded.

Generally the adult is dull yellow color, but in North Florida adults remain black.

The common name describes the walking and crawling behaviour of the grasshopper.  “Lubber” is from an old English word meaning lazy or clumsy.  Novice seamen were called “landlubbers”.

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Lyssomanes viridis

Size:  females 7-8-mm (2.8-3.1 inch), males 6-8mm (2,4-3.1 inch)

Range:  throughout Florida, from spring to early autumn

Habitat:  woodlands, on broad leaf evergreens (e.g. magnolias, bays) and live oak.

Food:  aphids, mites, ants, other plant insects and other jumping spiders

The photo above seems to be that of a female.

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Yucca flaccida (or filamentosa)

Forb/Herb, perennial

Native, L 48, C

The leaves of this variety of yucca is not erect and though often considered Yucca filamentosa, some sources suggest that it might be a species unto itself, flaccida.

It is a member of the Asparagaceae family and the young blossom shoots look like asparagus shoots.

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Egretta Caerulea

Habitat:    Atlantic coast from Massachusetts to Florida, along the Gulf of Mexico.                    Fresh water swamps, marshes; forages by wading in shallow water.

Diet:  Fish, frogs, lizards, snakes, turtles and crustaceans; when water is scarce, grasshoppers and other insects.

Nests:  Nests in colonies, stick nests in shrubs and small trees, 3-5 pale blue-green eggs.

During first year of its life, a young heron will be white and are likely to be seen feeding with snowy egrets.  In this company they are more likely to catch more fish and may be subject to less predatory interest.   Approaching adulthood, the white changes to patchy white-blue until the bird becomes the adult color of blue with tones of purple.

According to the 2016 State of North America’s Birds’ Watch List, the population declined 55% between 1966 and 2015.  Little blue heron is listed 14 out of 20 on the Continental Concern List.

P1020571P1020565P1020574Mitchella repens

Forb/Herb, Perennial

Native, L48, C

A small ground cover partridgeberry flowers always comes in pairs, sharing a single calyx.  Each flower in a pair differ:  one has a longer pistil and a shorter stamen, the other a shorter pistil and a longer stamen to prevent self-fertilization.  The berries which are red when mature require that both flowers in a pair must be fertilized.